Bandeau

Programme du Centre Culturel Irlandais

mis à jour le 22/01/18

LECTURE SERIES

Wed 24 Jan - Wed 28 Feb

7.30pm, reservation recommended, in English

€7 or €35 for all six lectures (€30 for students and unemployed)/ Group rate available on request at reservations@centreculturelirlandais.com

Peter Murray - A History of Irish Art

This illustrated lecture series will provide an insight into Irish art over the past four centuries, focusing on the work of individual artists, from James Barry in the eighteenth century to Norah McGuinness, Jack Yeats, Brian O’Doherty and Michael Craig Martin in the twentieth century. Art historian and former director of the Crawford Gallery Cork, Peter Murray will also examine the social, political and economic context within which these artists created their work.

24 Jan  Portraits and landscape painting in the 17th and 18th centuries
31 Jan  History painting 1780 – 1850
7 Feb    Representation of landscape in the 19th century
14 Feb  Irish women artists – Responses to Modernism
21 Feb  The art and writings of Jack Butler Yeats
28 Feb  The Unexpected Idea and its Realisation: Patrick Ireland/Brian O’Doherty, Michael Craig-Martin

Tickets can be reserved for the whole series or for each lecture individually.

EXHIBITION

Thursday 25 Jan - Sunday 13 May
Opening event Thursday 25 January, from 6.30 to 8pm, admission free

Tuesday to Sunday from 2pm to 6pm

(late opening on Wednesdays until 8pm)

Closed on Mondays, bank holidays, and 7 & 8 Fev, from 16 to 18 March and 10 April

Songs of Peace: Francis Ledwidge

The Irish poet, naturalist, activist, nationalist and soldier, Francis Ledwidge, died in Ypres in 1917 shortly before his thirtieth birthday. A century later, curator Sabina MacMahon has selected work by seven visual artists in response to the life and work of Ireland’s soldier poet. Ledwidge’s final volume of poems ‘Songs of Peace’ illustrates his poignant longing for the countryside of his home county of Meath. This intimate connection with landscape together with the conjoined themes of love and loss are explored in different ways by each artist presented in the show – an ode to the contemporary relevance of the poet’s oeuvre.

This exhibition is presented in conjunction with the Solstice Arts Centre, Co Meath.

The curator Sabina MacMahon will give a guided visit of the exhibition at 6pm on the opening night. Our artists-in-residence Lian Bell and Stephen Brandes invite you to come and visit their studios during the course of the evening.

SCREENING/MUSIC

Tuesday 30 January

7.30, reservation recommended, in English, 73 mins

Admission free

Rencontre with Siobhán Cleary

In association with the Embassy of Lithuania in France

Composer-in-residence Siobhán Cleary will present the fascinating documentary Book Smugglers for which she composed the musical score. From 1863, Tsar Alexander II decreed an outright ban on all usage of the Lithuanian language which covered education, press, and publishing. Simple possession of literature in Lithuanian became a crime. A new type of linguistic resistance fighter emerged: the knygnešys, or “book smuggler,” who risked his life smuggling and distributing books from East Prussia.

Retracing the history of the book smugglers, this documentary directed by Jeremiah Cullinane is presented through the eyes of an Irish-speaking poet. It inevitably draws parallels with the decline of the Irish language during the same century. A delicate and sensitive issue in Ireland, it raises controversial questions: How is it that a small nation under comparable conditions of occupation and oppression managed to survive and preserve their “minor” national language, to the point where practically all Lithuanians today speak it? What is the relationship, there and in Ireland, between a national tongue and a national or personal identity?

The screening will be followed by Q&A and a short recital by Siobhán Cleary.

TALK

Thursday 1 February
7.30pm, reservation recommended, in English
Admission free

Waking the Feminists

In residence at CCI, set designer and arts manager Lian Bell will discuss the highly successful campaign for equality for women in Irish theatre that she instigated under the hashtag #WakingTheFeminists. It began as a reaction to the dearth of plays written or directed by women in the Abbey Theatre’s Waking the Nation, the national theatre of Ireland’s programme marking the centenary of the 1916 Rising. The campaign “struck a match that has kept burning” across the Irish theatre community, and Lian will highlight its achievements over the last two years.

CinéCCI   

Les 3 Luxembourg, 67 rue Monsieur le Prince, Paris 6e

Tuesday 6 February

7.30pm, English version with French subtitles, 77 mins

€10/ €8 unemployed and seniors)/ €7 students/ UGC, Le Pass and Ecrans de Paris cards are accepted

It’s Not Yet Dark

In 2008, promising young Irish director Simon Fitzmaurice was diagnosed with motor neurone disease (ALS). At just 34 years old, he was given four years to live. Reeling from the shock, Fitzmaurice realised that his greatest defiance of ALS would be to direct his first feature film. Seven years later, despite total physical incapacitation, Fitzmaurice completed My Name is Emily (2015), directing it only with the use of his eyes. This emotional journey of self-realisation and personal triumph over life-crushing adversity is nothing short of inspiring. Captured with intimate home movies, photographs and an affectionate voice-over by compatriot Colin Farrell, it transports us into Fitzmaurice’s creative world where every physical and psychological challenge is met with positivity and the desire to fulfill a dream.

Official selection 2017 Sundance Film Festival

Winner – Best Feature documentary – 28th Galway Film Fleadh

Winner – Best Cinematography in an Irish Feature - 28th Galway Film Fleadh

Specially dedicated to Simon Fitzmaurice who died in October 2017, the evening will begin with the screening of his short film The Sound of People which premiered in 2007.

THEATRE

Thursday 8 February

7.30pm, reservation recommended, in English

60 mins

€10 (€7 for students and unemployed)

Kabosh presents

Green & Blue

By Laurence McKeown

With James Doran et Vincent Higgins

Directed by Paula McFetridge

Green & Blue explores the painful and humorous realities faced by the individuals who patrolled the border during the height of the conflict in Northern Ireland. Based on an oral archive of serving RUC and An Garda Síochána officers, the production fuses theatre and film to look at the person behind the uniform and the different experiences of two individuals on either side of a line in the ground:

At one point we took on a role that became an identity and that identity now defines us. We’re a uniform, not real people. And rightly or wrongly we now view the world from that perspective.

“A thoughtful, challenging and entertaining dramatisation of an oral history, casting light on police officers lives as they saw it.” (Culture Northern Ireland)

CHAPEL SESSIONS

Thursday 15 February

7.30pm, reservation recommended

€13 (€10 for students and unemployed)

Jack O’Rourke - Róisín O with Thanks Brother

Cork songwriter Jack O’Rourke is one of Ireland’s most exciting new emerging talents - his music has been compared to that of Kate Bush, Sufjan Stevens, Randy Newman and Father John Misty. Piano, plaintive baritone and ethereal falsetto characterise O’Rourke’s musicality as he pushes the boundaries of noir folk with heartbreaking torch songs intermingled with baroque pop. 

Born into a dynasty of successful musicians, Dubliner Róisín O is carving out her own career as a singer-songwriter. Since her first album The Secret Life of Blue, released to acclaim in 2012, she has been charming audiences around the world with her folk-infused pop-rock.  In Paris this evening, Róisín O presents her new project, Thanks Brother, for one of the group’s first live performances.

LITERATURE

Tuesday 20 February

7.30pm, reservation necessary (spaces limited), in English

Admission free

La Médiathèque rencontre… Claire-Louise Bennett

“A truly stunning debut, beautifully written and profoundly witty” is how The Guardian described our writer-in-residence’s first novel ‘Pond’ in 2015. Focusing on the semi-reclusive narrator’s mind in motion, the novel is comprised of twenty stories, the shortest of which runs to a couple of sentences.

As well as reading extracts from her work, Claire-Louise Bennett will discuss the gestation and writing of her book which has recently been published in French by Editions de l’Olivier as L’étang.

 READING (AND SYMPOSIUM)

Friday 23 February

7.30pm, reservation recommended, in English, 50 mins

Admission free

Gare St Lazare Ireland presents

How It Is

by Samuel Beckett

Published in French in 1961 when Samuel Beckett’s reputation as a playwright still overshadowed his novels and short stories, How It Is (Comment C’est) marked a turning point in the writer’s prose.  His last full-length novel, it is written entirely in short paragraphs punctuated only by the spaces between them and relates the solitary narrator’s existence before, during and after his encounter with a certain Pim.  It remains a most enigmatic and experimental work that challenges our ideas of form, content and the possibility of achieving meaning through language.  

World-renowned champions of Beckett, Gare Saint Lazare Ireland are organising an international symposium at CCI dedicated to this text. The culminating point of the day is a special reading of How It Is presented by Gare Saint Lazare Ireland.

MUSIC/READINGS

Thursday 1 March

7.30pm, reservation recommended, in English

€13 (€10 for students and unemployed)

Where Angels Listen

Organised in conjunction with our current exhibition, Where Angels Listen is a creative and affectionate response to the extraordinary life and poetry of Francis Ledwidge by some of Ireland’s most celebrated contemporary artists. A socialist, Republican, poet, politician, lover and soldier, Ledwidge died during World War I at the battle of Passchendaele in 1917. Award-winning playwright Deirdre Kinahan has invited the legendary musician Steve Wickham (The Waterboys), Sinéad Gleeson (RTÉ, The Book Show), Oisin Leech (The Lost Brothers), Saramai & Cormac O’Keefe, and beat poet Lewis Kenny to perform new works inspired by Ledwidge’s evocative poems. This promises to be a thrilling evening with an eclectic mix of music, readings and performance.

CinéCCI

Centre Wallonie-Bruxelles, 127-129 rue Saint-Martin, Paris 4e

Tuesday 6 March

7.30pm, reservation recommended, in English with French subtitles, 70 mins

As part of the Semaine des cinémas étrangers

Admission free

Broken Song

GI, Costello and Willa Lee are street poets, hip-hop artists and songwriters from north Dublin. For these young men self-expression in the form of poetry, rap and song has become a spiritual experience. Their aim is simply to articulate the chaos that surrounds them and to fight it with their words and voices alone. Along the way it has become their identity, their religion and, as they claim themselves, they are its high priests.

Directed by Claire Dix, this uplifting documentary premiered at the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival in 2013 where it won the Audience Award and the Dublin Critics Circle 'Discovery' Award.

A short rap performance by Costello will follow the screening.

This screening is presented as part of the Semaine des cinémas étrangers (6-16 March), organised by the Forum des Instituts Culturels Etrangers à Paris around the theme of cinema and music « Cinéma la la ! ».

CONCERT

Thursday 22 March

7.30pm, reservation recommended

Admission free

Isabelle O’Connell

Internationally acclaimed pianist Isabelle O'Connell presents a solo concert of recent works for piano and electronics, featuring Irish composers Linda Buckley, Donnacha Dennehy and Karen Power. This powerful programme will explore the possibilities of sound between live performer and synthesized sounds - from Karen Power’s field recordings to the manipulated piano overtones in Donnacha Dennehy’s Stainless Staining and the Icelandic-inspired Fridur by Linda Buckley. Hailed by the New Yorker as the "Irish piano phenom" Isabelle brings her combination of technical artistry and kinetic flair to the CCI!

CLASSICAL CONCERT

Friday 23 March

1pm, reservation recommended

Admission free

Thérèse Fahy plays Debussy
One of Ireland’s foremost pianists, Thérèse Fahy will treat us to a short lunchtime taster concert of 20 minutes in advance of her concert in the Maison natale de Debussy in St Germain-en-Laye on Sunday 25 March, which marks 100 years since Claude Debussy’s death. Thérèse will return to CCI in October 2018 to perform Ireland’s Tombeau to Debussy in its entirety over three nights (24-26 October) following her performance at the National Concert Hall in Dublin in May.

As well as presenting the work of Debussy, the three-night concert cycle will consist of the original 1920 Tombeau de Debussy, a series of work composed as a tribute to Debussy by Ravel, Stravinsky and Satie among others, as well as Ireland’s Tombeau to Debussy presenting newly commissioned work by Raymond Deane, Sebastian Adams, Gráinne Mulvey, Roger Doyle, Jane O'Leary and Siobhán Cleary, composed in honour of Claude Debussy on the 100th anniversary of his death.

MUSIC / POETRY

Thursday 29 March

7.30pm, reservation recommended, in English

€10 (€7 for students and unemployed)

The Kiss of Light

Poems by Frank Ormsby

Music by Anthony Toner (guitar), Neil Martin (cello), Linley Hamilton (trumpet)

This engaging night of music, poetry and storytelling is woven together by singer-songwriter Anthony Toner and Fermanagh poet Frank Ormsby with musical accompaniment by Neil Martin and Linley Hamilton. The performance encompasses new music by Anthony Toner composed in response to Frank Ormbsy's poems and celebrates the forthcoming release of their album of spoken word and music. 

Details of our St Patrick’s Festival and 20 years Good Friday Agreement events are attached to the email in separate documents.

 WORKSHOPS FOR ALL AGES

Saturday 10 to Friday 16 March

Workshops: Saturday 10 & Sunday 11 March, from 10am to 6pm, €10, reservation recommended

Drop-in Sessions: Monday 12 to Friday 16, from 1pm to 6pm, admission free

Who Let the Dogs Out?

Calling all dog lovers… CCI welcomes Tom Campbell’s Dog Project to Paris, the city where dogs are treated like royalty!

We ask you to lend a hand to help Cork-based artist Tom Campbell create 50 life-sized papier-mâché dogs. We’re counting on you to help us get there. The playful and idiosyncratic dogs will be let loose in CCI’s courtyard on St Patrick’s Day and then returned to their rightful owners. Those who participate in day-long workshops will be able to take their dog home after St Patrick’s weekend. Remaining dogs will go to those who take part in the drop-in sessions.

Saturday 10 & Sunday 11 March, 10am to 6pm, €10, reservation recommended, all ages welcome (children must be accompanied by an adult)

Spend a day with artist Tom Campbell to create your very own papier-mâché dog!

No materials needed but bring your picnic lunch and wear old clothes

Monday 12 to Friday 16 March, 1pm to 6pm, admission free, all ages welcome

Drop in to the artist’s studio in the courtyard of CCI and help Tom Campbell create 50 papier-mâché dogs to let loose on St Patrick’s Day!

CONCERT

Friday 16 March
7.30pm, reservation recommended
€15 (€12 for students and unemployed)

Chapel Sessions: Atlas

Cillian Doheny and Cillian King’s debut album Affinity brings together the traditional music they have grown up with and the music they have grown to love in more recent times. From delicate string arrangements reminiscent of Sigur Rós to cascades of sound from the ethereal world of Jon Hopkins, they have added an ingredient that is inherently Irish to the mix to create a record that encompasses where they have come from and where they are going.

“Atlas seamlessly blends traditional Irish folk elements with pop melodicism into something really colourful. Taut interplay between acoustic guitar and concertina, with world fusion rhythmic elements. It’s very cinematic music.” (Mark Lettieri, Snarky Puppy)

Friday 16 March, 1pm, admission free (subject to availability)
Atlas plays some tunes in the chapel at lunchtime in preparation for their full evening concert

AFTERNOON OF FESTIVITIES

Saturday 17 March

1pm – 5.30pm, admission free (in the courtyard)

Food and drink on sale: The Green Goose pub, foodtrucks

Admission free

St Patrick’s Family Day

Dress up with a touch of green and join us for a great afternoon of music, magic and mischief to celebrate St Patrick’s Day!

One of Ireland’s best magicians, Jack Wise, is launching festivities with his hilarious performance of ventriloquism and amazing magic tricks - watch out for his other improvised appearances throughout the weekend! We then welcome the five talented young members of Moxie who play Irish traditional music with a truly innovative twist. Tom Campbell is all set to entertain us on his monocycle and let loose his ‘pack’ of papier-mâché dogs (see here how you can help him create these dogs throughout the week). Face-painting, a colouring stand, food on sale and an opportunity to visit our multi-media library and beautiful chapel… something for all tastes and age groups!

CONCERT

Saturday 17 March

7.30pm, reservation recommended

€18 (€15 for students and unemployed)

Moxie

With Cillian Doheny (tenor banjo, guitar), Jos Kelly (button accordion, keyboard), Darren Roche (button accordion), Ted Kelly (tenor banjo), Josh Sampson (percussion)

This group of five talented musicians is inspiring audiences worldwide with their new palette of 21st century Irish music: jazz, rock, bluegrass and world music creatively structured around a solid traditional backbone. Following their winning of the Spirit of Folk Award, Moxie came to play at CCI’s Fête de la Musique in 2014 and garnered critical acclaim for their first album Planted released the same summer. Nothing has stopped them since!
 “Soulful, sexy and full of passion. Listen to this band! Get out and see them live! You will not be disappointed!"(Winifred Horan, Solas)
“Harmonious, energetic and tenacious, there’s no idea where Moxie will take you.” (BBC)
"Irresistible, revolutionary energy" (***** The Irish Times)

CONCERT

Saturday 18 March

7.30pm, reservation recommended

€20

Sharon Shannon

Sharon Shannon has music at her fingertips…literally ! The accordionist from Ireland has achieved legendary status throughout the world and has made the much-maligned accordion ‘cool’ in her home country. She is renowned for her collaborations, not just in Irish traditional music but across all musical genres: hip-hop, Cajun, country, classical and rap. Her latest recording Sacred Earth embraces blues, North and West African music as well as reggae.

Sharon has recorded and toured with a host of world-class singers and musicians including Bono, Adam Clayton, Sinead O’Connor, Jackson Browne, John Prine, Steve Earle, Mark Knopfler, The Chieftains, The Waterboys, Willie Nelson, Nigel Kennedy, Alison Krauss and Shane MacGowan – a list that is testament to Sharon’s versatility and talent. A prolific composer, Sharon also released an album of original music in 2012 recorded with the RTE Concert Orchestra – The Flying Circus.

“Sharon Shannon defines casual brilliance. She plays accordion with carefree fluidity, virtuosic but not flashy, performing traditional Irish music with a contemporary freshness.” – Boston Globe

Twenty years ago, on 10 April 1998, the Northern Ireland Peace Agreement was signed on Good Friday. Centre Culturel Irlandais marks this with a series of events that refer to the context of the Troubles and the Agreement as well as discussing responses to the post-conflict era and the challenges posed by Brexit.

CINECCI

Les 3 Luxembourg, 67 rue Monsieur le Prince, Paris 6e

Tuesday 3 April

7.30pm, English version with French subtitles, 92 mins

€10/ €8 unemployed and seniors)/ €7 students/ UGC, Le Pass and Ecrans de Paris cards are accepted

Maze

Inspired by the true story of the escape by 38 IRA prisoners from the notorious Maze Prison in 1983 (which left one prison officer dead and others seriously injured), Maze is a post-hunger strike narrative which eschews jailbreak high-jinx in favour of intense character-driven drama.
IRA prisoner Larry Marley (Tom Vaughan-Lawlor) plans his escape with unwavering determination, despite the reservations of fellow inmate, Oscar (Martin McCann). When he realises world-weary prison warder Gordon Close (Barry Ward) may be useful for his plan, he manages to nurture a relationship which will have far-reaching consequences for them both. Filmed in a recently decommissioned Cork prison, Stephen Burke re-engages with his interest in Northern Irish narratives to deliver a tonally authentic, largely non-partisan drama which explores how ordinary people survive in extraordinary circumstances

 “Gritty… Maze gets the tone right.” (Screen International)

“Closer to the great escape than we could have expected … Exciting, well-made …. The tension is well sustained.” (**** The Irish Times)

TALK

Monday 9 April

7.30pm, reservation recommended, in English

Admission free

Declan Long - Ghost-haunted Land

Contemporary art and post-Troubles Northern Ireland

Since the signing of the Good Friday Agreement in 1998, contemporary visual artists have offered diverse responses to post-conflict circumstances in Northern Ireland. In his new book, launched in Paris this evening, art critic and lecturer Declan Long examines the work of artists who have reflected on the ongoing anxieties of aftermath through video, photography, painting, sculpture, performance and installation. Presentation of the publication will be followed by discussion with the audience.

ROUND-TABLE DISCUSSION

Tuesday 10 April

7.30pm, reservation recommended, in English

€5

The Border: Artists’ Perceptions

On this day twenty years ago, 10 April 1998, the Northern Ireland Peace Agreement was signed on Good Friday. To mark the occasion, we have invited a number of artists to Paris to discuss their experiences and perceptions of how the Border between Ireland and Northern Ireland has evolved over the last twenty years. Visual artists Rita Duffy and John Byrne, poet Maria McManus and musician Duke Special will be in conversation with art critic Declan Long and Emmanuel Tellier, senior reporter for Télérama magazine, who recently went to Ireland to interview these artists.

CONCERT

Thursday 12 April

7.30pm, reservation recommended

€13 (€10 for students and unemployed)

Chapel Sessions: Duke Special

With his distinctive look, Peter Wilson aka Duke Special delivers live performances in a wonderfully theatrical style inspired by Vaudeville and music hall. Tonight the Ulster-born singer-songwriter will present a selection of beautiful songs from his latest album Hallow. Always “trying to get to the bottom of what it means to be human”, Duke Special’s source of inspiration for this album is the work of eminent Belfast poet Michael Longley whose poetry he describes as “full of gentleness, honesty, mischief and love”.

 “This is music of magic and soul” THE TELEGRAPH

DOCUMENTARY & DISCUSSION

Tuesday 17 April

7.30pm, reservation recommended, in English

€5

John Hume and his role in the Peace Process

This evening of film and discussion is devoted to John Hume, founder of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) in Northern Ireland and joint Nobel Peace Prize-winner in 1998. Narrated by actor Liam Neeson, the documentary In the Name of Peace: John Hume in America (90 mins) includes wide-ranging interviews with former US Presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, and UK Prime Ministers John Major and Tony Blair. A special screening of the documentary will be followed by a panel discussion on John Hume’s role in the Peace Process with the following participants:

Maurice Fitzpatrick, scholar and director of In the Name of Peace: John Hume, the first feature-length documentary to be made about John Hume

Pierre Joannon, Writer, historian and Franco-Irish diplomat. Author of John Hume (1999) Editions Beauchesne, with a postface by former Irish Prime Minister Garret FitzGerald

Michael Lillis, Writer and Irish diplomat. Deputy Secretary General of the Department of Foreign Affairs (1983-85) and first joint secretary of the Anglo-Irish Secretariat, Maryfield, Belfast (1985-87)

Andy Pollak (moderator): Writer, editor and expert on North-South Cooperation in Ireland. Founding Director, Centre for Cross Border Studies, Armagh and Dublin. Reporter, assistant news editor, news features editor, religious affairs correspondent and education correspondent, The Irish Times (1986-1999)